The Roman Invasion of Britain

...a campaign for Commands & Colors Ancients

This campaign contains 10 scenarios which are played in sequence. One player takes the Romans and one the Britons. The player who has amassed the greater number of Victory Banners after all scenarios have been played is the winner. It is possible for a player to amass glory in one battle and then use it to affect the following battle. 

Scenarios 

Julius Caesar’s expeditions to Britain      

1. Invasion of Britain (55 BC)

2. River Stour (54 BC)

3. Foraging Party (54 BC)

Conquest of Britain 

4. Medway (43 AD)

5. Claudius in Britain (43 AD)

6. Cefn Carnedd (51 AD)

7. Mona Insulis (60 AD)

8. Camulodunum (60 AD)

9. Boudica's Revolt (61 AD)

10. Mons Graupius (84 AD)

Scenario 1 - Invasion of Britain (55 BC)

This is scenario 217 from Commands & Colors Ancients - Expansion 2.

Scenario 2 - River Stour (54 BC)

This is scenario 218 from Commands & Colors Ancients - Expansion 2.

Scenario 3 - Foraging Party (54 BC)

This is scenario 219 from Commands & Colors Ancients - Expansion 2.

Scenario 4 - Medway (43 AD)

This is scenario 407 from Commands & Colors Ancients - Expansion 4.

Scenario 5 - Claudius in Britain (43 AD)

This is a new scenario that I have created to represent the Emperor Claudius in Britain and includes the elephants that Lucius Cassius Dio mentions in his Historia Romana.

Scenario 6 - Cefn Carnedd (51 AD)

This is scenario 223 from Commands & Colors Ancients - Expansion 2.

Scenario 7 - Mona Insulis (60 AD)

This is scenario 17 from C3i Magazine.

Scenario 8 - Camulodunum (60 AD)

This is scenario 18 from C3i Magazine.

Scenario 9 - Boudica's Revolt (61 AD)

This is a modified scenario based on 408 from Commands & Colors Ancients - Expansion 4. However statistics showed that the Romans had a 91% chance of winning this scenario, so I have adjusted it slightly to make it more balanced.

Scenario 10 - Mons Graupius (84 AD)

This is scenario 410 from Commands & Colors Ancients - Expansion 4.


Campaign Rules - Glory Counters

Glory Counters are awarded at the end of each battle. The can be used in the next battle. Glory Counters left unused at the end of a battle are lost.

Gaining Glory Counters

The winning side gains two Glory Counters .The losing side gains one Glory Counter. If the loosing side fails to get at least half the required number of Victory Banners, the winning side gets an additional Glory Counter. One additional Glory Counter is awarded for each leader hit and for each eagle or boar standard captured. 

Glorious Rearguard Action

The losing side may attempt to fight a rearguard action. Both sides roll a D20 and add the number of mounted blocks (MC, LC, LBCH) that they have remaining. The side with the highest number gains a Glory Counter. In case of a draw, no Glory Counter is awarded.

Spending Glory Counters

Glory Counters can be spent in subsequent battles in the campaign in a number of different ways. A player may only spend one Glory Counter per player turn.

Replace a Command Card

A Glory Counter can be spent at the start of the turn immediately prior to playing a Command Card in order to discard one card from the player’s hand and draw a replacement.

Rally

A Glory Counter can be spent at the start of the turn immediately prior to playing a Command Card in order to return a single block of any type to any single under-strength unit anywhere on the battlefield. A unit may not gain more blocks than it originally had. Rallied units may not be ordered this turn (they are too busy rallying). Elephants may not be rallied.

Heroic

A Glory Counter can be spent at any time causing a unit to become heroic. It will remain heroic for the rest of the player turn and all of the following player turn. While heroic, the unit will score a hit for each leader symbol rolled in close combat and may ignore one flag. Elephants may not be heroic.

Leader Activation

A Glory Counter can be spent at the start of the turn immediately after playing a Command Card in order to additionally activate a leader.

Stragglers

At the start of a battle, a Glory Counters may be spent to make the opposing army straggle. Roll one die to determine the effect. 

Die Roll Effect
Red, Blue or Green Your opponent must choose a unit of this type and remove one block from it. If there a no units of this type, roll again.
Leader No effect.
Flag Your opponent must retreat one unit of his choice back one hex.
Swords You remove one block from any unit of your choice providing that it does not have an attached leader.


Scenario Special Rules

Roman Legions

All Roman Heavy infantry and Roman Medium infantry units are armed with pilum and sword.

These units are considered both close combat and missile weapon capable units and must follow the rules for Ranged Combat when utilizing the Range Combat capability. A Roman Legion unit has a range of two hexes and will roll 1 battle die when it holds or moves only one hex. As with other missile weapon capable units, a Roman Legion unit may not perform both Ranged and Close Combat in the same turn.

Julius Caesar 

When the Julius Caesar leader is attached to any Roman unit, that unit will battle with one additional battle die in Close Combat (including battling into or out of terrain hexes that reduce the normal number of dice used). When attached to a Roman foot unit (except for War Machines), that unit may move two hexes and Close Combat against an enemy unit.

If Julius Caesar is hit, he will be replaced in any following scenario by a normal leader.

Boudica

After all other movement has been completed, and unless already ordered, Boudica may move 3 hexes if by doing so she attaches to a friendly unit that is adjacent to an enemy unit.

If Boudica is hit, she will flee the field in her chariot and still be available in any following scenario.

Capturing an Eagle

An aquila (eagle) was the standard of a Roman legion. A legionary known as an aquilifer, the "eagle-bearer", carried this standard. Each legion carried one eagle.

The eagle had quasi-religious importance to the Roman soldier, far beyond being merely a symbol of his legion. To lose a standard was an extreme disgrace.

When a Roman Legion (HI or MI) unit is eliminated in melee (including battle back) its opponent should attempt to capture the eagle. To be eligible, an ordered unit must take ground.

Roll 2 dice, on a result of two Flags, two Swords, or one of each then the Eagle has been captured.

Place a Special Unit marker on the capturing unit. The capturing unit will, unless at full strength, immediately rally one block. For the rest of the scenario it will score one hit for each leader symbol rolled in close combat and it may ignore one flag. 

Capturing a Boar Standard

The Celtic Boar was a totem animal which was used as a military standard similar to the eagle of the Romans. They were larger than often used by wargamers, about shoulder width (around 50cm). They were typically made of bronze sheet so wouldn't have been too heavy to carry.

It is believed that the boar in Celtic religious contexts represents both war (because of their ferocity and indomitability) and prosperity (because pork was a favourite Celtic food and played an important part in feasting).

The standards may also represent the Celtic god Moccus. He is the boar- or swine-god. Moccus was invoked as the protector of boar hunters and warriors. Boar meat was sacred among the ancient Celts.

When a Celtic Warrior unit with attached Leader is eliminated in melee (including battle back) by any unit other than an Elephant, its opponent should attempt to capture the boar standard. To be eligible, an ordered unit must take ground.

Roll 2 dice, on a result of two Flags, two Swords, or one of each then the boar standard has been captured.

Place a Special Unit marker on the capturing unit. The capturing unit will, unless at full strength, immediately rally one block. For the rest of the scenario the capturing unit may make a bonus close combat attack after a momentum advance even if not normally permitted to do so.


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